Awards


photo-awardsIn 1982 Lucy received the Joseph Henry Jackson Award in Literature for her first poetry collection, Self-Portrait with Hand Microscope (Berkeley Poets’ Workshop and Press). She has received many subsequent awards for her writing.

“Whether her subject is neural folds, hatching turtles, tumors, or self-planting seeds, Lucille Day’s tight poetic descriptions take us effortlessly toward our inevitable relationship with other forms of matter. The poet’s range widens to include a sequence of dramatic moments in which the painful ironies of family life are coupled to tender appraisals of marriage, child rearing, and domestic obligations.” — Robert Pinsky, David Littlejohn, and Michael Rubin, Judges, Joseph Henry Jackson Award

Links:


“In Praise of the Jellyfish,” Grand Prize, Dancing Poetry Contest, 2008

“Fear of Science,” Janice Farrell Poetry Prize, 2007

“Falling in Florence,” Pushcart Prize nomination, 2013

Awards


2016

Gold Seal Literary/Cultural Arts Award from Artists Embassy International
for Red Indian Road West: Native American Poetry from California

2015

Honorable Mention, Janice Farrell Poetry Prize, Soul-Making Literary Competition,
for “Child’s Grave and Finery”

Pushcart Prize nomination from Červená Barva Press for “I Always Knew It”

2014

Blue Light Poetry Prize and Chapbook Award for Dreaming of Sunflowers: Museum Poems

Pushcart Prize nomination from Waccamaw for “Poet as Scientist”

Finalist, Blue Light Book Award, for Becoming an Ancestor: Poems

Finalist, Red Berry Editions’ Summer Chapbook Contest, for Window Seat: Sonnets & Villanelles

Semi-finalist, Blue Lynx Prize in Poetry, for Becoming an Ancestor: Poems

Semi-finalist, Tupelo Press Snowbound Chapbook Award, for Inside My Eye

Honorable Mention, 2014 Allen Ginsberg Poetry Awards, sponsored by the Poetry Center at Passaic County Community College, for “Devlin at Seven Months and the Morning News”

Best of the Net nomination from Blue Lyra Review for “Rituals”

2013

PEN Oakland – Josephine Miles Literary Award for Married at Fourteen: A True Story

Finalist, Northern California Book Award in Creative Nonfiction,
for Married at Fourteen: A True Story

First Prize, Dancing Poetry Contest of Artists Embassy International, for “Water Lilies”

First Honorable Mention, Prose, Times They Were A-Changing:
Women Remember the 60s & 70s
, for “The Trip”

Honorable Mention, Janice Farrell Poetry Prize, Soul-Making Literary Competition,
for “Welcome Home”

Pushcart Prize nomination from Arroyo Literary Review for “Falling in Florence”

2011

Finalist, Blue Light Poetry Prize and Chapbook Competition, for Conjunctions

Pushcart Prize nomination for “Journeys,” published in Redactions: Poetry & Poetics

2010

“Time-Out!” listed as a Notable Essay in Best American Essays 2010.

First Prize, Poets’ Dinner, “Love” category, for “Let Me Count the Ways”

Honorable Mention, Poets’ Dinner, “Nature” category, for “Resplendent Quetzals”

2009

Willow Review Award for Creative Nonfiction for “Stalked”

Pushcart Prize nominations from Červená Barva Press for “Artists”
and “The Liberation of Baghdad”

2008

Grand Prize, Dancing Poetry Contest of Artists Embassy International, for “In Praise
of the Jellyfish”

Third Prize, Dancing Poetry Contest of Artists Embassy International, for “Woman”

Honorable Mention, Glimmer Train Short Story Award, for “The Last Slave”

Honorable Mention, California Federation of Chaparral Poets, for “Fate of the Universe”

Honorable Mention, California Federation of Chaparral Poets, for “Shoplifter”

2007

First Prize, Janice Farrell Poetry Prize, Soul-Making Literary Competition, for “Fear of Science”

First Prize, Poetry Contest of Gulf Coast Ethnic and Heritage Jazz Festival, for “Earth Music”

Finalist, Marsh Hawk Press Poetry Prize, for The Curvature of Blue

Semi-finalist, Crab Orchard Series in Poetry, for The Curvature of Blue

Semi-finalist, Paumanok Poetry Award, Visiting Writers Program of Farmingdale
State College, New York

Honorable Mention, Jewel by the Bay Poetry Contest, for “Aunt Ethel, Please”

Pushcart Prize nominations from Červená Barva Press for “Counting” and “A Death”

2006

Finalist, Tupelo Press Snowbound Chapbook Competition, for The Book of Answers

Finalist, Blue Light Book Award, for Color of the Universe (re-titled The Curvature of Blue)

Second Prize, Dancing Poetry Contest of Artists Embassy International, for “God of the Jellyfish”

Third Prize, Dancing Poetry Contest of Artists Embassy International, for “The Poem’s Feet”

High Distinction, Margaret Reid Prize for Traditional Poetry, for “Color of the Universe”

Honorable Mention, Passager Poetry Contest, for “Aunt Ethel, Please”

Honorable Mention, Society for Humanistic Anthropology Poetry Contest, for “I Always Knew It”

2005

Second Place, Blue Light Book Award, for Color of the Universe (re-titled The Curvature of Blue)

Finalist, Dorset Prize, for Color of the Universe (re-titled The Curvature of Blue)

Finalist, Červená Barva Press Chapbook Competition, for The Book of Answers

Finalist, Poetry West Chapbook Competition, for The Book of Answers

Finalist, Two Rivers Review Chapbook Prize, for The Book of Answers

Semi-finalist, Paumanok Poetry Award, Visiting Writers Program of Farmingdale
State College, New York

Pushcart Prize nomination from River Styx for “Mictlantecutli at the Health Museum”

2003

Third Prize, Dancing Poetry Contest of Artists Embassy International, for “Song of the
Slender Salamander”

1999

Third Prize, Ann Fields Poetry Contest, for “Birth of the Universe,” “Fear of Science,” and “Self-Portraits at the Health Museum”

1998

First Prize, Dancing Poetry Contest of Artists Embassy International, for “Dancers”

Third Prize, Barbara T. Ewing Poetry Contest of the Maryland Poetry Review for “Converting”

1996

Appalachia Poetry Prize for “Tracking”

1982

Joseph Henry Jackson Award in Literature for Self-Portrait with Hand Microscope

1979

Third Prize, Free Verse, Chabot College Spring Arts Festival, for “The Bed and the Boxcar”

Third Prize, Southern California Chapter of the California State Poetry Society, for “Glass Animals”

Honorable Mention, Galbraith Memorial Prize of the Academy of American Poets, UC Berkeley, for group of eight poems

1977

First Prize, Poets of the Vineyard Annual Poetry Competition, for “Edge”

Fourth Prize, Hibiscus Press Poetry Contest, for “Heart Patient”

1971

Honorable Mention, Dorothy Rosenberg Memorial Prize Competition in Lyric Poetry, UC Berkeley, for group of seven poems

I Always Knew It

I knew it at four when I ran for the creek
every chance I got
and my uncle called me “the wild Indian”
as I slid down the bank,
then leapt from stone to stone
to reach the other side.
I knew it when my parents threatened
to give me back to the Indians
if I didn’t behave.
I didn’t care. I wanted
to meet the Indians.
I knew it as I rooted for them
in all the old Westerns
and lamented when they lost
and were cast as the bad guys
again and again. I knew it
when my Native American studies
teacher said, “I think you’re an Indian,”
and when my aunt told my mother,
“Tell her the truth. Tell her
what she wants to hear.”
I knew it at twenty-three
as I stood at a dusty crossroad
on the Rosebud Reservation.
It was stamped on my mother’s
high cheekbones and woven
in her dark hair. It was clear
as the difference between
flat redwood needles
and the scales of a giant sequoia,
clear as the difference
between the musical
chirps of Wilson’s warbler
and the soft, hoarse whistle
of Brewer’s blackbird. I could feel
the People of the First Light stirring
inside me with each contraction
of actin and myosin fibers
in all my muscles, with each
nerve impulse as sodium
rushed into my neurons
and potassium rushed out.
I knew it all along. I knew it
before I could prove it
with a DNA test, long before
I’d heard of Wampanoags. I always
knew it. By the stick-like body
of the tule bluet, the silence
of the lynx chasing rabbits for food,
the silvery needles of Sitka
spruce, and the yodel-like
laugh of the common loon,
I knew it was true.

Lucille Lang Day


Honorable Mention,
2006 Ethnographic Poetry Contest.
First published in
Anthropology and Humanism,
University of California Press