Interviews & Reviews


photos-interviews2-2006

Lucy’s books have been reviewed in The Alsop Review, Bay Area Poets Seasonal Review, Booklist, Boston Area Small Press and Poetry Scene, Femmes Artistes International, ForPoetry.com, The Hudson Review, Ibbetson Street Update, Kirkus Reviews, Midwest Book Review, The Montclarion, Poet Lore, Poesia, Poetry Flash, PoetryMagazine.com, Psychological Perspectives, Quill and Parchment, San Francisco Review of Books, School Library Journal, Small Press Review, Star Line, and many other publications.

Interviews with her and articles about her have appeared in such publications as Bay Area Poets Seasonal Review, Berkeley Poetry Review, California Montlhly, examiner.com, Listen! Listen!, The Montclarion, North Coast Literary Review, The Oakland Tribune, and The San Francisco Chronicle. Her radio and TV interviews include Jane Crown, Blog Talk Radio; Jack Foley, KPFA Cover to Cover; Jerri Garner, American Radio Network; Michael Krasney, KQED Forum; Eileen Malone, PEN Women Presents; Connie Martinson, Connie Martinson Talks Books; and Suzanne Lang, KRCB A Novel Idea.

Links:


Interviews

Interview in Balancing the Tide: Motherhood and the Arts

Interview in DC Literature Examiner

Interview on Jane Crown’s Poetry Radio

Self-Interview in The Nervous Breakdown

Interview originally in San Francisco Book Review

Interview in SF Poetry Examiner

Wordsmith Interview in Crack the Spine

Interview in Words with Writers

Reviews

Review of The Curvature of Blue in Wild Goose Poetry Review, by Scott Owens

“On the Nature of Day and Raine,” by Brad Bostian
Review of Infinities in For Poetry.com

Review of Married at Fourteen: A True Story in San Francisco Book Review, by Zara Raab

Review of Married at Fourteen: A True Story in Kirkus Reviews

Review of Married at Fourteen: A True Story in Bookin’ with Sunny, by Dave Holt

Review of Wild One from The Alsop Review, by Jack Foley

Praise


For Married at Fourteen: A True Story (2012)

“The uncompromisingly frank account of a gifted woman’s unlikely journey from teenage mother and juvenile delinquent to award-winning writer and scholar…her remarkable story and its happy ending make for memorable reading.”  — Kirkus Reviews

For The Curvature of Blue (2009)

“There is that rare feeling, that you can hardly wait to reread a poem you are reading for the first time because you know you will find some slyly hidden bulb the next time.”  — Daniel Langton, Psychological Perspectives

For God of the Jellyfish (2007)

“Always accessible, the accomplishment of God of the Jellyfish is Day’s ability to be both lighthearted and profound at once…Day tells us it is good to be alive, fully inhabiting the moment, reveling in the natural world.”  — Joan Gelfand, Bay Area Poets Seasonal Review

For The Book of Answers (2006)

“It is the love poems in this collection, with their fusion of sensuous language and images from the natural world, that I find the most touching. ”  — Anne Kahn

For Chain Letter (2005)

“An original and popular addition to any school or community library picture book collection, Chain Letter is very highly recommended — especially for all young readers who might one day encounter one of these seemingly endless chain letters.”  — Children’s Bookwatch, Midwest Book Review

For Infinities (2002)

“How does one categorize such an uncategorizable talent?. . .Her poetry, like scientific field work, is informed by remarkable powers of observation, curiosity and the urge to answer, or at least attempt to answer, The Big Questions.”  — Elizabeth Bantos, Ibbetston Street Update

For Wild One (2000)

“Confessional poetry too easily collapses into self-exploitation and too rarely approaches universality. But Day’s generous collection is that rara avis, the successful, indeed gripping, autobiography in verse.”  — Patricia Monahan, Booklist

For Fire in the Garden (1997)

“By sheer will, she is determined to override the unconscious fear, the dread of the unknown. I, for one, believe she has done it, and wherever these roads, trains, leaps, and ladders might lead, the poems leave the reader looking forward to the next book.” — Timothy Houghton, Poet Lore

For Self-Portrait with Hand Microscope (1982)

“a narrative gift which…might win her an important place in American letters.”  — Emily Grosholz, The Hudson Review

Red Shoes

My mother sits in the living room,
wearing her red shoes.
“Call 911,” she says.
“I’m too weak to move.
And be sure to bring my red purse
to the hospital.  It matches my red shoes.”

“Is your mom okay?”
the neighbors ask. “We saw
the ambulance take her away.
She smiled at us, waved
like she was off for a cruise.
She looked so cute in her red shoes.”

In intensive care she asks,
“What did they do with my red shoes?
Lucy, look in that cabinet
and under the bed.
They were in a bag with my clothes.
I don’t want to lose my red shoes.”

Mom, I’d like to take you for a walk
in your red shoes. We could stroll
down Piedmont Avenue,
but you have something better to do.
You’re already dancing
beyond the moon, in your red shoes.

Lucille Lang Day


From Wild One, first published
in The Hudson Review